Unit 6 Practice Test

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Question 1

Questions 1–3 refer to the maps below.

INSERT IMAGE HERE  

What factor best explains why the boundary lines in the two maps above are different?

A
Imperialism
B
Self-determination
C
Industrial Revolution
D
Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
Question 1 Explanation: 
When political boundary lines on a map do not match the ethnolinguistic boundaries, it signifies that the lines were drawn arbitrarily. Imperialism explains how one more powerful state would create empires that encompassed many cultural groups, without thought or consideration of those who lived there. Over time these groups gained independence, yet the scars of imperialism in Africa remain evident in the boundary lines between states.
Question 2

INSERT IMAGE HERE  

What ideology was used to justify your response in question 1?

A
Liberalism
B
Capitalism
C
Nationalism
D
Mercantilism
Question 2 Explanation: 
A range of ideologies inspired imperialism, including Social Darwinism, nationalism, the concept of the civilizing mission, and the desire to religiously convert indigenous populations. Even though capitalism and mercantilism were systems in place during the age of imperialism, they were not used to justify the negative consequences of imperialism, but rather the motive.
Question 3

INSERT IMAGE HERE  

A historian researching the creation of new states in Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries would most likely find the two maps as useful information for which of the following?

A
Opium War
B
Yaa Asantewaa War
C
Túpac Amaru II’s rebellion
D
The Ghost Dance Movement
Question 3 Explanation: 
Yaa Asantewaa was an Ashanti queen in modern-day Ghana who led a revolt against their British colonizers while the king and other leaders who held in captivity. Her rebellion was the fifth in what became known as the Yaa Asantewaa War, or War of the Golden Stool.
Question 4

Questions 4–7 refer to the passage below.

…So Raziya lost her kingdom because she was not enough of a woman to make her people love a woman ruler; and she died, because she was a woman, and without protection. And her story is told here, for the reason that that we know now that the old historian was wrong; and that a women need not fail even in the great work of a sovereign, only because she is a woman. Raziya failed because she thought that for success she must put aside her womanhood. Our Queen Victoria succeeded. And one of the things we know that she gave to her people was that same great heart of a woman and a mother, which poor Raziya believed that she must slay.

Source: Sorabji, Cornelia. Indian Tales of the Great Ones. Bombay: Blackie and Son, 1916. Accessible in“Women in World History,” a project by The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University.
 

Which portion of the text most indicates the influence of nationalism during the Indian independence movement?

A
“and she died, because she was a woman, and without protection.”
B
“And her story is told here, for the reason that that we know now that the old historian was wrong;”
C
“Raziya failed because she thought that for success she must put aside her womanhood.”
D
“Our Queen Victoria succeeded. And one of the things we know that she gave to her people was that same great heart of a woman and a mother,”
Question 4 Explanation: 
Even though India did not gain independence, nationalism and anti-colonialism was evident in India throughout the 19th century. One such example was the Sepoy Rebellion in 1857. The desire to remember a portion of Indian history most demonstrates this spirit of nationalism.
Question 5

…So Raziya lost her kingdom because she was not enough of a woman to make her people love a woman ruler; and she died, because she was a woman, and without protection. And her story is told here, for the reason that that we know now that the old historian was wrong; and that a women need not fail even in the great work of a sovereign, only because she is a woman. Raziya failed because she thought that for success she must put aside her womanhood. Our Queen Victoria succeeded. And one of the things we know that she gave to her people was that same great heart of a woman and a mother, which poor Raziya believed that she must slay.

Source: Sorabji, Cornelia. Indian Tales of the Great Ones. Bombay: Blackie and Son, 1916. Accessible in“Women in World History,” a project by The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University.
 

All of the statements below about the author are true. Which statement accurately reflects a limitation of this source as a historical account of Raziya’s reign?

A
She was born in 1870 to a Parsee family in India.
B
She was the first female law student at Oxford University.
C
She preferred living in Britain and even favored British rule in India.
D
She practiced law in India because she was banned from practicing in Britain.
Question 5 Explanation: 
The author Cornelia Sorabji wrote this children’s book about 13th century ruler Raziya. Her education and heritage make her a trustworthy source. However, her preference for British rule is evident in her allegiance to Queen Victoria in the text. This makes her less credible in retelling a historical account of the past.
Question 6

…So Raziya lost her kingdom because she was not enough of a woman to make her people love a woman ruler; and she died, because she was a woman, and without protection. And her story is told here, for the reason that that we know now that the old historian was wrong; and that a women need not fail even in the great work of a sovereign, only because she is a woman. Raziya failed because she thought that for success she must put aside her womanhood. Our Queen Victoria succeeded. And one of the things we know that she gave to her people was that same great heart of a woman and a mother, which poor Raziya believed that she must slay.

Source: Sorabji, Cornelia. Indian Tales of the Great Ones. Bombay: Blackie and Son, 1916. Accessible in“Women in World History,” a project by The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University.
 

Which of the following was an important continuity underlying the construction of the literary piece above (during the early 20th century)?

A
Hindi was the dominant religion in India.
B
Bombay was an important trading city in India.
C
Traditional gender roles were followed in India.
D
The garment industry was vital to the economy in India.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Even though each statement is true, the traditional gender roles impacted the construction of this children’s book. The author’s limitations to practice law in Britain may have inspired her to write about an important woman Indian ruler. Furthermore, the text clearly juxtaposes the acceptance of gender between Queen Victoria and Roziya.
Question 7

…So Raziya lost her kingdom because she was not enough of a woman to make her people love a woman ruler; and she died, because she was a woman, and without protection. And her story is told here, for the reason that that we know now that the old historian was wrong; and that a women need not fail even in the great work of a sovereign, only because she is a woman. Raziya failed because she thought that for success she must put aside her womanhood. Our Queen Victoria succeeded. And one of the things we know that she gave to her people was that same great heart of a woman and a mother, which poor Raziya believed that she must slay.

Source: Sorabji, Cornelia. Indian Tales of the Great Ones. Bombay: Blackie and Son, 1916. Accessible in“Women in World History,” a project by The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University.
 

Both associated with Britain, how did the formation of the state of India compare with the United States?

A
The United States was a settler colony of Britain, India was an occupation colony.
B
India’s landholdings were consolidated after a war with Britain, the U.S. was not.
C
The United States was directly controlled by the British government, India was not.
D
India was shaped by private ownership of a British trading company, the U.S. was not.
Question 7 Explanation: 
The time period between the 18th and 20th centuries saw major changes in state-building. Even though the empires remained staples during the Age of Imperialism, the way colonies were obtained and the way they transitioned to statehood varied. In the instance of these two former British colonies, the United States was built as a settler colony in which the British were meant to drive out other occupants. In contrast, India was meant to be an occupation colony only.
Question 8

Questions 8–10 refer to the image below.

Sacking Guano to be Shipped by Automatic Trolley in the Ballestas Islands, Peru (1910)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

The mining of guano is most similar to which of the following?

A
Rice cultivation in China
B
Sugar plantations in the Caribbean
C
Cotton production in the United States
D
Rubber extraction on the Congo basin
Question 8 Explanation: 
Both raw materials were in high demand in the west during a time period of unparalleled agricultural, industrial and urban growth. As a result, guano mining and rubber extraction created a resource-based export economy in lesser developed regions of the world. The profits from these ventures were used to purchase finished goods.
Question 9

Sacking Guano to be Shipped by Automatic Trolley in the Ballestas Islands, Peru (1910)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

The boom and bust of the guano industry is best understood in the context of which event?

A
Cultural revolution
B
Democratic revolution
C
Agricultural revolution
D
Anti-colonial revolution
Question 9 Explanation: 
The high demand for guano during the late 19th and early 20th century was fueled by an agricultural revolution. As populations grew rapidly, farmers around the world needed more effective sources of fertilizer. Materials like guano were later replaced by other nitrate-based substitutions.
Question 10

Sacking Guano to be Shipped by Automatic Trolley in the Ballestas Islands, Peru (1910)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

A historian studying the decline of guano mining in Peru might corroborate the evidence in this image with which source?

A
A sociologist’s study on the impact of farming technologies
B
A historian's record of anti-colonial revolutions in Latin America
C
An economist’s interpretation of resource exports around the globe
D
An environmentalist’s map of major storm events in the Pacific Ocean
Question 10 Explanation: 
The decline of guano mining is similar to other resource exports around the globe in the 19th and 20th centuries. Most resource export-based economies follow a boom and bust pattern that is not sustainable for the exporting country. This may explain why these countries did not develop as fast as others in the world.
Question 11

Questions 11–13 refer to the passage below.

“The Land System of the Heavenly Kingdom,” Hung Xiuquan (1853)
…There being fields, let all cultivate them; there being food, let all eat; there being clothes, let all be dressed; there being money, let all use it, so that nowhere does inequality exist, and no man is not well fed and clothed. All men and women, every individual of sixteen years and upwards, shall receive land, twice as much as those of fifteen years of age and under…. In every circle of twenty-­five families, all young boys must go to church every day, where the sergeant is to teach them to read the Old Testament and the New Testament, as well as the book of proclamations of the true ordained Sovereign.... In the creation of an army, for each 13,156 families there must first be a corps general…the entire army numbering altogether 13,156 men… Each man throughout the empire who has a wife, sons, and daughters amounting to three or four mouths, or five, six, seven, eight, or nine mouths, must give up one to be a soldier… Throughout the empire all officials must every Sabbath, according to rank and position, reverently present sacrificial animals and offerings, sacrifice and worship, and praise the Heavenly Father, the Supreme Lord and Great God. They must also expound the Holy books; should any dare to neglect this duty, they shall be reduced to husbandmen. Respect this.

Source: Franz Michael, The Taiping Rebellion: History and Documents, vol. 2, Documents and Comments (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1971), pp. 313­315, 319­320.
 

Which statement accurately reflects the connection between the Taiping Kingdom and European imperialism?

A
The Taiping Rebellion was a war against imperialist powers.
B
The Taping Kingdom exported the commodity of Opium abroad.
C
The Taiping Rebellion weakened the Qing during the Opium Wars.
D
The Taiping Kingdom supported the influence of the British and French.
Question 11 Explanation: 
During the reign of the Taiping Kingdom, industrialized states practiced economic imperialism in China, mostly through the trading of Opium. When the British and French attacked the Qing during the Second Opium War, the dynasty was weakened by the civil war it was fighting with the Taiping Kingdom. This was known was the Taiping Rebellion.
Question 12

“The Land System of the Heavenly Kingdom,” Hung Xiuquan (1853)
…There being fields, let all cultivate them; there being food, let all eat; there being clothes, let all be dressed; there being money, let all use it, so that nowhere does inequality exist, and no man is not well fed and clothed. All men and women, every individual of sixteen years and upwards, shall receive land, twice as much as those of fifteen years of age and under…. In every circle of twenty-­five families, all young boys must go to church every day, where the sergeant is to teach them to read the Old Testament and the New Testament, as well as the book of proclamations of the true ordained Sovereign.... In the creation of an army, for each 13,156 families there must first be a corps general…the entire army numbering altogether 13,156 men… Each man throughout the empire who has a wife, sons, and daughters amounting to three or four mouths, or five, six, seven, eight, or nine mouths, must give up one to be a soldier… Throughout the empire all officials must every Sabbath, according to rank and position, reverently present sacrificial animals and offerings, sacrifice and worship, and praise the Heavenly Father, the Supreme Lord and Great God. They must also expound the Holy books; should any dare to neglect this duty, they shall be reduced to husbandmen. Respect this.

Source: Franz Michael, The Taiping Rebellion: History and Documents, vol. 2, Documents and Comments (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1971), pp. 313­315, 319­320.
 

What commodity was banned by the Taiping Kingdom, but highly sought after in China and European markets?

A
Rubber
B
Copper
C
Cotton
D
Opium
Question 12 Explanation: 
During the nineteenth century, Opium was produced in India but exported through China by Britain and France. This supply chain gave European powers a comparative advantage over the commodity in global markets. The social cost of the addictive drug in China was staggering, which explains why the Taiping Kingdom outlawed its use.
Question 13

“The Land System of the Heavenly Kingdom,” Hung Xiuquan (1853)
…There being fields, let all cultivate them; there being food, let all eat; there being clothes, let all be dressed; there being money, let all use it, so that nowhere does inequality exist, and no man is not well fed and clothed. All men and women, every individual of sixteen years and upwards, shall receive land, twice as much as those of fifteen years of age and under…. In every circle of twenty-­five families, all young boys must go to church every day, where the sergeant is to teach them to read the Old Testament and the New Testament, as well as the book of proclamations of the true ordained Sovereign.... In the creation of an army, for each 13,156 families there must first be a corps general…the entire army numbering altogether 13,156 men… Each man throughout the empire who has a wife, sons, and daughters amounting to three or four mouths, or five, six, seven, eight, or nine mouths, must give up one to be a soldier… Throughout the empire all officials must every Sabbath, according to rank and position, reverently present sacrificial animals and offerings, sacrifice and worship, and praise the Heavenly Father, the Supreme Lord and Great God. They must also expound the Holy books; should any dare to neglect this duty, they shall be reduced to husbandmen. Respect this.

Source: Franz Michael, The Taiping Rebellion: History and Documents, vol. 2, Documents and Comments (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1971), pp. 313­315, 319­320.
 

Which excerpt from the source can be used as evidence to support a claim about the Taiping Kingdom’s lasting impact on China?

A
“...so that nowhere does inequality exist, and no man is not well fed and clothed.”
B
“In every circle of twenty-­five families, all young boys must go to church every day”
C
“In the creation of an army, for each 13,156 families there must first be a corps general”
D
“Each man throughout the empire who has a wife, sons, and daughters ... must give up one to be a soldier”
Question 13 Explanation: 
The theocratic-military entity known as the Taiping Kingdom was unique in China’s history. Even though its religion and military practices did not have long-term impacts on China, their policies to promote equality are still evident in China today.
Question 14

Questions 14–16 refer to the image below.

Japanese Farmers at a Tea Plantation in Sao Paulo, Brazil (1930)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

Which statement about Japanese immigration to Brazil is accurate?

A
The Meiji extended the Shogunate policies on immigration.
B
The Meiji permitted emigration to address widespread unemployment.
C
The Meiji reduced tariffs on Brazil in exchange for an open door to trade.
D
The Meiji faced widespread droughts, which resulted in mass emigration.
Question 14 Explanation: 
Rapid industrialization and urbanization strained Japan during the Meiji Restoration. As a result, the country permitted emigration in hopes that remittances would counterbalance the negative effects of unemployment.
Question 15

Japanese Farmers at a Tea Plantation in Sao Paulo, Brazil (1930)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

What comparison between Japanese immigrants in Brazil and immigrants in Europe during the same time can be drawn from the photograph?

A
Unlike most migrants in Brazil, migrants in Europe were often left jobless.
B
Unlike most migrants in Europe, migrants in Brazil were unable to return home.
C
Unlike most migrants in Brazil, migrants in Europe faced tremendous discrimination.
D
Unlike most migrants in Europe, Japanese immigrants in Brazil lived mostly on farms.
Question 15 Explanation: 
Transportation, urbanization and industrialization led to global migration shifts. In Europe most migrants moved to cities, whereas in Japan most migrants remained farmers in more rural areas. New modes of transportation around the world made it easier for migrants to send remittances and move back home.
Question 16

Japanese Farmers at a Tea Plantation in Sao Paulo, Brazil (1930)
INSERT IMAGE HERE  

What made Japanese immigration to Brazil unique compared to the Chinese in Peru, Cuba and Mexico?

A
The Japanese were often sold into forced labor.
B
The Japanese were free to relocate looking for work.
C
The Japanese were transported to Brazil under convict labor contracts.
D
The Japanese were so burdened by debt that many chose indentured servitude.
Question 16 Explanation: 
During the nineteenth century, Asian migration to Latin America skyrocketed. The Japanese mostly relocated to Brazil and Peru by choice. In contrast, the Chinese were often sold into slavery or indentured servitude in Peru. It is also worth noting that convict labor was common during this time period.
Question 17

Questions 17–20 refer to the maps below.

INSERT MAPS HERE  

What explains the similarities between both maps?

A
People with the same culture settled together.
B
Urban planners used a similar model of development.
C
Gentrification and displacement of low income residents.
D
One imperial elite family transplanted themselves around the globe.
Question 17 Explanation: 
Ethnic enclaves such as Little Italy trace their roots to mass immigration of Italians during the 19th century. Italians at the time were not always welcome to their new host country. As a result of social and/or legal discrimination, Italians settled close to each other and created an enclave of their culture within the city.
Question 18

INSERT MAPS HERE  

What statement most accurately reflects the environment in both ethnic enclaves mapped above during the 19th century?

A
Italian-owned restaurants, shops and businesses dominated the area.
B
Community gatherings were largely dictated by the influence of the church.
C
Residents experienced greater economic prosperity than they did back home.
D
A spirit of innovation led to faster developments in transportation and industry.
Question 18 Explanation: 
Ethnic enclaves throughout the world sought to preserve the culture of their homeland, especially in the face of discrimnation for their nationality. Thus, residents would celebrate their culture and support other like businesses.
Question 19

INSERT MAPS HERE  

What description most accurately depicts migrants to the areas shown above?

A
Mostly males looking for work.
B
Mostly women looking for opportunities.
C
Mostly married couples looking to escape poverty.
D
Mostly families with kids looking for a better future.
Question 19 Explanation: 
During the nineteenth century, patterns among migrants emerged. Most migrants tended to be males who would leave a woman behind. This gave women greater responsibility and opportunity back home.
Question 20

INSERT MAPS HERE  

Historians might attribute the trends on the maps above to which change during the 19th century?

A
The development of industrial capitalism.
B
The establishment of new colonies and states.
C
The revolution and rebellion against existing governments.
D
The emergence of transoceanic empires and a global economy.
Question 20 Explanation: 
Shifts in migration are largely attributed to the emergence of global empires and the global economy. For example, over 500,000 Indians were taken to East African colonies as indentured servants. This was made possible because of Britain’s global empire and its role in global markets.
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